Embracing Diversity Means Doing the Hard Work

Back to Top

Racial Diversity

Over the past week, we’ve seen communities across the world erupt in response to the death of George Floyd. While signs and chants call for justice for George, it is heartbreaking to know this is far more than an isolated incident. Not only did the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor come just months before, but these victims personify racial prejudices marginalized communities face every day.

Yes, these protests are a fight for justice for George Floyd and too many victims who have come before him, but they are also a continued fight against a history of systemic bias and racism.

Looking at our diverse workforce at S&C, I am certain recent events have hit home for many of our team members and are a reminder of the injustices they, too, have experienced. Despite us all sharing the same workplace, I know that we do not all share the same experiences—and that these experiences can be so starkly different from each other.

More than 290 U.S. counties consist of so many races there is no longer a majority and a minority. At S&C, we strive for a workforce that accurately reflects the diversity of the world we live in and believe that diversity brings better ideas and builds stronger teams. While we are intentional about diversity when we hire, it is even more important to make sure the diversity we have cultivated works to break down biases and fosters understanding.

So often we talk about “celebrating diversity” by celebrating the happier, easier things. We do this every year at S&C with celebrations like Diwali with our Indian team members, Black History Month, and PRIDE with our LGBTQ team members. While these events do help to bridge divides and raise awareness, we cannot shy away from things that are harder, such as the racial injustices that persist today.

Truly embracing diversity takes work. It means having the hard, sad, or awkward conversations. Sometimes it means speaking up, and sometimes it means listening. Sometimes it means educating yourself, and sometimes it means educating others. Or it may mean starting to recognize there are unjust realities that exist in this world, even if they are not your personal reality. Whatever that work may be, at S&C we stand for respect for all people—and that means standing up for equality and justice.

Expert

Aurelie Richard

Publication Date

June 3, 2020